[BREAKING] CMS finalizes MU flexibility

By Helen Gregg, first posted on Becker’s Hospital Review, August 29, 2014

CMS has issued a final rule granting providers the flexibility in meaningful use attestation the agency had originally proposed back in May.

Under the modified attestation schedule, providers that were not able to fully implement 2014 Edition certified EHR technology in time to successfully attest to meaningful use due to vendor delays will be able to use 2011 Edition CEHRT or a combination of 2011 and 2014 Edition to attest to either stage 1 or stage 2. Providers will also be able to attest to meaningful use under the 2013 reporting year definition and use 2013′s clinical quality measures.

Full Story 

[Keynote Presentation] “Linking Strategy, Innovation, and Execution” with Peter Kung, Director, Strategic Technologies, UCLA Health, UCLA Institute for Innovation in Health, Director, Information Systems & Technology, UCLA Semel Institute – NFRC

Keynote Presentation “Linking Strategy, Innovation, and Execution”

Peter Kung
Director, Strategic Technologies
UCLA Health
UCLA Institute for Innovation in Health
Director, Information Systems & Technology
UCLA Semel Institute – NFRC

[Presentation] “Think Big, Act Small” with Deborah Dahl, VP, Patient Care Innovation, Banner Health

Presentation “Think Big, Act Small”

What if…
The chronically ill had a fighting chance of staying out of the hospital?

Banner Health is moving from reactive care to proactive healthcare through a combination of focused people, standardized processes, and technology.  By identifying adverse trends and intervening before those adverse trends become adverse outcomes, we can prevent hospitalization and post-acute care stays.   We are improving the members quality of life while reducing costs for our ACO through member engagement, shared decision-making and leveraging behavioral economist techniques for behavior change, while using a new proactive home health Telehealth platform.

Deborah Dahl
VP, Patient Care Innovation
Banner Health

iHT2 case studies and presentations illustrate challenges, successes and various factors in the outcomes of numerous types of health IT implementations. They are interactive and dynamic sessions providing opportunity for dialogue, debate and exchanging ideas and best practices. This session will be presented by a thought leader in the provider, payer or government space.

[Presentation] Case Study “Health IT Transformation: Insurance Exchange and Provider Perspective” with Curt Kwak, Chief Information Officer, Proliance Surgeons

Case Study ”Health IT Transformation: Insurance Exchange and Provider Perspective”

Curt Kwak
Chief Information Officer
Proliance Surgeons

iHT2 case studies and presentations illustrate challenges, successes and various factors in the outcomes of numerous types of health IT implementations. They are interactive and dynamic sessions providing opportunity for dialogue, debate and exchanging ideas and best practices. This session will be presented by a thought leader in the provider, payer or government space.

Presentation “Integration and Collaboration: A Vision for a Pediatric Health Information Network (PHIN)” Wes Wright, SVP, CIO, Seattle Children’s

Presentation “Integration and Collaboration: A Vision for a Pediatric Health Information Network (PHIN)”

Seattle Children’s Hospital (SCH) has a mission to prevent, treat and eliminate pediatric disease throughout the Pacific Northwest. That mission includes connecting patients, parents and providers with the information and support they need to manage care from birth to early adulthood.

Pediatric healthcare poses a number of unique challenges. Unfortunately, these needs are not well served by typical state or regional health information exchanges (HIEs), which are designed primarily to support an adult patient population and its caregivers.

For this reason, SCH and its provider partners are establishing a pediatric health information network (PHIN) spanning Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho.

SCH’s IT strategy is simple: To provide critical clinical and research data to those who need it at the right time, in the right place, and on the right device. The PHIN strategy takes this a step further by creating connected pediatric care communities.

SCH has over 357,000 patient visits a year and nearly 15,000 admissions. It has received nationwide recognition for pioneering SIDS research, craniofacial surgeries, and innovative leukemia therapies. Through partnerships, it operates across a multistate region with complex rules for sharing pediatric data. In combination with its clinically integrated network partners (CIN), led by Pediatric Associates, the initial PHIN will link nearly 90% of all pediatric providers in the region and span more than 40 electronic health record (EHR) systems.

What if this innovative vision for a pediatric HIE were expanded to a national scale? This session will describe the strategic, technological, and human factors that must come together for an initiative of this magnitude, and the leadership and passion that is making it possible.

 

eCQMs & CDS: Two Sides of the Same Coin

MUSCCampusBy Laura Pedulli at Clinical Innovation + Technology

First Posted on August 29, 2014

Electronic clinical quality measures (eCQMs) and clinical decision support (CDS) share many similarities and common requirements, all with the goal of improving healthcare quality.

Recognizing the potential to better link the two, in late March the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) launched the Clinical Quality Framework (CQF), an open source project to set standards to better harmonize CDS and eCQMs. This work is being facilitated through the ONC’s Standards & Interoperability Framework.

“We know we need to do both to improve care,” says Amy Hewig, MD, MS, acting chief medical officer for the Office of the Chief Medical Officer at ONC—speaking during a kickoff event unveiling the CQF initiative. “One of the most important strategies we have at ONC is linking e-clinical quality measures to clinical decision support so providers can not only measure performance, but really improve it as well.”

Full Story

Interested in learning more about improving data sharing? Join HealthCare Partners, LLC, SacValley MedShare (SVMS) and Valley Presbyterian Hospital on their ”Improving Data Sharing with Interoperability” panel, taking place on November 4-5 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Beverly Hills.

Click Here to Learn More

 

Providers Optimistic About HIEs

optimistic_22By Kate Wike at Health IT OUTCOMES, First Posted on August 28, 2014

Data from the ONC shows that while health information exchanges have pros and cons, providers are generally optimistic when considering them.

The ONC’s latest report - National Health Information Exchange and Interoperability Report - found that, although participation in a health information exchange (HIE) has both positive and negative outcomes, most providers are confident that HIEs will benefit them.

According to the report, the majority of physicians who electronically exchange data with other providers report quality and efficiency benefits. Eighty percent reported HIEs increased their practice’s efficiency. Additionally, 89 percent reported exchanging information increased their practice’s quality of care.

Full Story

Interested in learning more about ACOs and population health management? Join St. Joseph Health System,  St. Joseph Heritage Healthcare, Cedars-Sinai Health System  and Heritage Medical Systems on their “ACOs and Population Health Management: An IT Enabled Health System” panel taking place November 4-5 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Beverly Hills.

Click Here to Learn More

Interview with Luis Taveras, PhD, SVP & CIO, Barnabas Health

Luis Taveras, PhD, SVP & CIO, Barnabas Health

Don’t box yourselves into just having an IT role.  Act like a business leader who has an expertise in information systems but can certainly be instrumental in the realization of strategies throughout all parts of the organization.  Be seen as a General Manager and not just a CIO.

Dr. Luis E. Taveras is Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer for Barnabas Health. Barnabas Health is New Jersey’s largest integrated health care delivery system, providing treatment and services to more than two million patients each year. Dr. Taveras was most recently in the same capacity at Hartford HealthCare, the largest health care network in Connecticut. From 2003-2009, Dr. Taveras was a Partner with Accenture. Before joining Accenture, Dr. Taveras was the Chief Technology Officer and Senior Vice President for St. Vincent Catholic Medical Centers of New York, Prior to that, he was a Senior Partner and Vice President responsible for Computer Sciences Corporation’s East Coast Health Care Practice and a member of KPMG Consulting’s Health Care Technology Practice. Dr. Taveras also spent nearly two decades in a number of leadership positions with IBM’s Health Care and Higher Education Practices. Dr. Taveras earned his Ph.D. at the University of Sarasota, his MBA from Rutgers University and a Bachelor of Science from Wesleyan University.

As a distinguished faculty member of the Institute’s upcoming Health IT Summit in New York, taking place, September 16-17, 2014, Taveras shares insight into his role as CIO of New Jersey’s largest integrated health care delivery system.

Institute:
 Can you start by giving us a brief overview of Barnabas Health and your role as CIO?

Taveras: Barnabas Health is New Jersey’s largest integrated health care delivery system, providing treatment and services to more than two million patients each year. Throughout Barnabas Health, our dedicated physicians, nurses, and health professionals are committed to providing the highest quality of patient care and health education to the community and region.  As the CIO of this thriving organization, I am responsible for providing the enabling technologies that will help us achieve our vision of providing the best care for our patients in the most affordable way possible.  In this role, I am responsible for all information systems and clinical engineering devices throughout the entire organization.

Institute: Can you please describe some of the innovative and disruptive initiatives launched at Barnabas?

Taveras: We have defined a 5-years operational and strategic plan that will help transform the organization into a data driven clinical and business environment which a major focus on quality and the ability to improve the health of the population of patients that we serve.  This includes the launching of a Health Information Exchange (HIE) which will improve our ability to share patient treatment information with all providers of care in our community and beyond.  We are also building the foundation for an enterprise data warehouse and the associated analytics that will allow us to streamline the patient care processes, thus eliminating variations in quality and delivering more consistent and compassionate care to our patients who come to us during very vulnerable times in their lives.  We belief that live is much better healthy and our solutions will help us achieve a healthier population in the area we serve.

Institute: What policies, procedures, and processes has Barnabas Health implemented to address information governance?

Taveras: We have established a senior level Analytics Steering Committee that will guide our journey into the world of analytics, including predictive analytics which will allow us to proactively reach out to our patients to treat an illness before they are feeling any symptoms.  Below the Analytics Steering Committee, we have the Analytics Work Group which is composed of all the leaders who manage and consume data throughout the organization.  This group is focused on inventorying the current environment and defining our future needs for data storage, management and security.  We will continue to expand the focus of these teams as we progress up the analytics maturity curve.

Institute: You will be participating on the “Anatomy of Health System” panel, taking place at the Institute’s upcoming Health IT summit in New York, September 16-17, 2014. What are the main topics you are most excited to discuss with your fellow panelists during this discussion?

Taveras: 

1. The transformation from a fee-for –service environment to a value purchasing environment and the catalytic role of the CIO in this transformation.
2. How do we deliver more strategic value with the same or less resources
3. The role of Governance in positioning IT as a strategic asset

Institute: Can you share a piece of advice to your fellow leaders in healthcare?

Taveras: Don’t box yourselves into just having an IT role.  Act like a business leader who has an expertise in information systems but can certainly be instrumental in the realization of strategies throughout all parts of the organization.  Be seen as a General Manager and not just a CIO.

About  iHT² 

Institute for Health Technology Transformation (iHT²) is the leading organization promoting the collection of private sector executives and public growth and effective use of technology in the health sector. Through the joint efforts of the Institute provides programs that stimulate innovation, education and a critical understanding of how to improve the technological applications, solutions and equipment quality, safety and efficacy of health care. The Institute is working in partnership withHealthcare Informatics and was acquired by the Vendome Group, LLC, Healthcare Informatics’ parent company, in December 2013. Vendome produces high-quality information for professionals in the healthcare industry and serves their needs through online, print, mobile, webinars and face-to-face engagement.  For more information, visit www.ihealthtran.com.

New tool takes measure of public health

Got-Public-Health-jpgBy Healthcare IT News, First Posted on August 26, 2014

It has historically been difficult for public health officials — especially at cash-strapped state and local departments — to  gauge whether their outreach and initiatives really work. A new tool from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Health Partners aims to change that.

Community Health Advisor predicts the health and economic impact of public health policies at the county level.

The tool uses data such as rates of smoking and obesity applied to a sample of 13 million people. It calls on demographic and health data from sources such as the U.S. Census and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

A set of health economics models called ModelHealth, developed over 15 years by researchers at the HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research, powers Community Health Advisor to address obesity, tobacco use, cardiovascular disease and many others.

Full Story

Interested in learning more about evolving models for data exchange? Join  North Cypress Medical Center, Greater Houston Healthconnect  and Texas Health Services Authority on their  “Evolving Models for Data Exchange: Driving Value and Innovation” panel, taking place on December 10-11 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Houston.

Click Here to Learn More 

 

Pentagon Accepting Bids for $11B EHR Modernization Project

pentagonBy iHealthBeat.com, First Posted on August 27, 2014

On Monday, the Department of Defense issued a final solicitation for bids for an  $11 billion Defense Healthcare Management Systems Modernization contract, FierceGovernmentIT reports

(Sarkar,FierceGovernmentIT, 8/26).

In February 2013, DOD and Department of Veterans Affairs officials announced plans to halt a joint integrated electronic health record, or iEHR system, and instead focus on making their current EHR systems more interoperable (iHealthBeat, 5/1).

In the effort to update its EHR system, DOD over the last year has:

As part of the project, DOD will replace the:

  • Armed Forces Health Longitudinal Technology Application, or AHLTA;
  • Composite Health Care System; and
  • Various EHR components, including AHLTA-Theater (FierceGovernmentIT, 8/26).

Full Story

Interested in learning about data sharing? Join  HealthCare Partners, LLC, SacValley MedShare (SVMS) and Valley Presbyterian Hospital on their ”Improving Data Sharing with Interoperability” panel, taking place on November 4-5 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Beverly Hills.

Click Here to Learn More 

Interview with Daniel Barchi, SVP & CIO, Yale-New Haven Health System

Daniel Barchi, SVP & CIO, Yale-New Haven Health SystemDaniel Barchi is Chief Information Officer of the $3.0 B, 2,100 bed, 19,000 employee Yale School of Medicine and the Yale-New Haven Health System. He leads a team of 500 informatics and technology specialists and has implemented a $300 M Electronic Medical Record (EMR) project. Before joining Yale, he was Senior Vice President and CIO of the $1.4 B Carilion Health System and led the integration of Carilion’s seven hospitals and 140 physician practices though implementation of a $98 M electronic medical record. He was also responsible for technology at the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine.

As a distinguished member of the Institute’s upcoming Health IT Summit in New York, taking place, September 17-18, 2014, Barchi shares insight into his role as SVP and CIO of Yale-New Haven Health System.

Institute: As CIO at Yale-New Haven Health System, can you start by giving us a brief overview of your role?

Barchi: I lead a really talented team of 550 people who provide all of the technology and analytics capability for the Yale New Haven Health System and the Yale Medical Group.  We support four hospital campuses, about 2,500 beds, about 1,500 physicians in practices, and about 20,000 employees.  In addition to the core network, data center, and storage technologies, we support he clinical, business, and operational applications that allow us to deliver world-class medicine to our patients.

Institute: What are some of your top priorities over the next few years?

Barchi: In the past four years we have made significant organizational changes to integrate ITS operations and major investments in our infrastructure including implementation of the $290 M Epic electronic medical record.  Our focus now is on getting the return on those investments by optimizing the EMR for our physicians and workflows.  Overall, however, analytics is our main area of new focus.  Data is the currency of quality care and good patient outcomes.  We are beginning to leverage our technology tools to give our clinicians the data they need to deliver outstanding care.

Institute: Now that Epic is in place at all YNHHS delivery networks, were there particular departments or areas of care that responded easier than others?

Barchi: The entire Yale New Haven Health and Yale School of Medicine enterprise responded remarkably well to the rollout of the integrated EMR.  What is exception about the process is that even though each area approached Epic from a different starting point including paper and other legacy EMRs, each area of operations did really well.  In a situation like this, everyone needs to make changes and compromises to achieve uniform care on a single platform and there was a broad spirit of learning and compromise that made the project a success.

Institute: How has Epic helped improve the quality of and efficiency of care?

Barchi: The efficiency of care has been improved by our rigorous adherence to working towards a single common record.  Our clinicians can share insights in real time on patient image, they get lab results immediately in their Epic InBasket, they can share lab results with patients through the MyChart portal, they can reduce the number of phone calls they make or respond to by communicating asynchronously with patients through the portal, and they have access to more than ten years of legacy data from multiple EMRs through our single common platform.  Quality is driven largely by the data the system provides.  It is unreasonable to expect that physicians and nurses remember the indications of use and the adverse effects of more than 15,000 medications and their potential conflicts with the other medications and allergies of their patients.  Through bedside barcode medication authentication and drug/drug and drug/allergy alerts, the EMR can provide an additional layer of safety that we did not have before.

Institute: You will be participating on the panel discussion “Driving Population Health Management with IT Innovation” at the upcoming Health IT Summit in New York, what can attendees of the program expect to take away from your participation?

Barchi: In the same way that simple population-wide innoculations have driven broad health and safety gains over the past one hundred years, the simple fact of having broad swaths of patient data available is remarkable in what it means to population health management.  The ROI on large EMR implementations is hard to identify, but the kind of population health management capability that we expect to use to improve health while driving down costs over the next few years would not be possible without a commitment to rigorous adherence to processes, standards, and definitions.  Population health management is not driven by cutting edge technology, but by broad implementation and routine use of common tools.

About  iHT² 

Institute for Health Technology Transformation (iHT²) is the leading organization promoting the collection of private sector executives and public growth and effective use of technology in the health sector. Through the joint efforts of the Institute provides programs that stimulate innovation, education and a critical understanding of how to improve the technological applications, solutions and equipment quality, safety and efficacy of health care. The Institute is working in partnership withHealthcare Informatics and was acquired by the Vendome Group, LLC, Healthcare Informatics’ parent company, in December 2013. Vendome produces high-quality information for professionals in the healthcare industry and serves their needs through online, print, mobile, webinars and face-to-face engagement.  For more information, visit www.ihealthtran.com.

Georgia Medical Board Rules In-Person Examination Required for Telemedicine Care

telemedicine_cirlceBy Gabriel Perna, First Posted August 26, 2014

The Georgia Composite Medical Board has enacted regulations surrounding telemedicine care within the state, requiring patients to have an in-person examination before getting treatment through the technology.

The regulations, which establish the minimum requirements to practice telemedicine within the state, went into effect earlier this year in May. The two major restrictions are that the provider must have conducted an in-person treatment before caring for the patient through telemedicine and they must be licensed to practiced in Georgia. These two requirements are echoed in many other telemedicine guidelines, including standards set by the American Medical Association and the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB).

Full Story

Interested in learning more about data analytics? Join St. Joseph Health System, California Department of Health Care Services  and California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development on their ”Data Analytics:  Improved Visibility and Better Outcomes” panel, taking place on November 4-5 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Beverly Hills.

Click Here to Learn More 

DoD Officially Issues RFP for Mega EHR Contract

DBy Gabriel Perna, First Posted on August 27, 2014

The Department of Defense (DoD) has issued a formal request for proposals (RFP) for its mega multi-billion dollar electronic health record (EHR) modernization project, which already has been the source of heated competition by various major industry vendors.

The DoD says it is aiming to select the winner in the third quarter of fiscal 2015. It plans to have the final, modernized systems in place by the end of 2016.

The RFP, announced this week, outlines the DoD’s efforts to replace its legacy healthcare systems, including the Armed Forces Health Longitudinal Technology Application (AHLTA), Composite Health Care System (CHCS) (inpatient), and most components of the Theater Medical Information Program-Joint (TMIP-J). When finished, the Defense Healthcare Management System Modernization (DHMSM) project will aim to support medical readiness for DoD’s military personnel and support the department’s current population of more than 9.6 million beneficiaries and over 153,000 Military Health System personnel.

Full Story

Interested in learning more about population health? Join North Texas Regional Extension Center, Seton Ministry- Ascension Health Information Services and Baylor Scott & White Health  on their l ”Thriving in a New Reimbursement Model: Why Data is Key to Population Health Management” panel, taking place on December 10-11 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Houston.

Click Here to Learn More

VA Investigation: No Proof That Falsified Data Led to Vets’ Deaths

investigation-630x286By iHealthbeat.com, First Posted on Auguts 26, 2014

Claims that 40 veterans might have died because of delayed care and manipulated waiting lists at a Department of Veterans Affairs health center in Phoenix, Ariz., are unsubstantiated, according to an internal investigation, the New York Times reports.

In April, Sam Foote, a retired physician at the Phoenix VA Health Care System, claimed that employees at the practice inaccurately used the center’s electronic health record system and “deliberately” created a secret waiting list to hide documentation of delays in care. According to Foote, up to 1,600 patients were placed on a secret electronic waiting list at the Phoenix center, sometimes waiting months to over a year to have an appointment scheduled.

The waitlist scandal resulted in the resignation of VA Secretary Eric Shinseki and spurred several investigations.

Earlier this month, President Obama signed into law a $16.3 billion bill (HR 3230) to overhaul the VA and improve veterans’ access to care in part by extending telehealth services through its mobile VA centers (iHealthBeat, 8/7).

Full Story

Interested in learning more about payer-provider alignment strategies? Join Houston Methodist and Village Family Practice on their “Payer-Provider Alignment Strategies for Quality Improvement” panel, taking place on December 10- 11 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Houston.

Click Here to Learn More 

 

Will (Human) Radiologists Be Turned Into Digital Apps? Don’t Worry, It Won’t Be Like That

radiologistsBy Mark Hagland, First Posted on August 28, 2014

It was fascinating to read a rather existential blog in the past week about radiologists’ role in the new healthcare

It was fascinating to read a rather existential blog written by Douglas G. Burnette, Jr., M.D., a practicing radiologist, in the online edition ofDiagnostic Imaging.In his August 22 blog, Dr. Burnette says this: “Radiologists along with the rest of society are becoming digitally detached and the more detached we are, the harder it is to assert our value. Our virtual omnipresence and digital efficiency may have sown the seeds of our destruction.”Further, “Have you noticed how often websites offer live chats lately?” he asks. “I believe that while this is a very efficient way to communicate, it also removes the barriers and stigma of language and ethnicity from the exchange of information. The frustration of dealing with someone in a phone bank in India is gone. It will be just that easy to replace us someday.”

Full Story

Interested in learning more about  securing ePHI? Join UCLA Health, Kaiser Permanente Orange County and Sharp Healthcare on their  ”Securing ePHI: Striking a Balance Between Usability and Security” panel, taking place on November 4-5 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Beverly Hills.

Click Here to Learn More 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...