Moving the Collections Process Up Front

collections moneyBy John DeGaspari, first posted on Healthcare Informatics, September 30, 2014

One hospital system’s initiative for early conversations about payment minimizes the chance of ‘sticker shock’ later

If there is one constant in the ever-changing world of U.S. healthcare, it’s that there is a huge squeeze on profit margins—a fact that affects even not-for-profit hospital systems, which need operating funds to continue their mission of providing care. That’s the observation of Lori Szymonowicz, senior director of patient financial services at Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals (TJUH), a Philadelphia-based academic medical center with 1,020 beds in four primary sites.She notes that her organization recognized that it was not deploying point-of-service collections in many of its departments, including the ED. She says that initiating the collections process early benefits both the hospital and the patient. “We have an obligation to educate our patients and work with them pre-service, so we can address financial matters separate from their clinical experience and improve their experience overall at Jefferson,” she says.Full Story

Interested in learning more about population health management? Join North Texas Regional Extension Center, Seton Ministry- Ascension Health Information Services and  Baylor Scott & White Health on their ”Thriving in a New Reimbursement Model: Why Data is Key to Population Health Management” panel, taking place on December 10-11 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Houston. 

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Striking a Balance Between Cost and Quality of Care

balance By John DeGaspari, first posted on Healthcare Informatics, September 30, 2014

How HR professionals are setting priorities on care quality and employee retention amid budgetary constraints

Although labor ranks among the highest-cost items in the budgets of most healthcare organizations, tight budgets and the lack of time and resources from tackling of too many initiatives have posed significant challenges to healthcare provider organizations when it comes to human resources and staffing issues. That’s among the conclusions of two recently released industry reports that look at issues of hiring, staffing and employee retention in the healthcare sector.

Yet employee productivity and skill sets are especially relevant to healthcare providers that are intent on improving the quality of care. Joe Van De Graaf, senior research director and author of a report from the Orem, Utah-based KLAS on human capital management released in August, points out that while human capital management—the set of practices and processes around managing people in an organization—may not be the absolute number-one priority from a strictly IT perspective, it is an important initiative and shared goal at the senior executive level at many provider organizations that are seeking to manage and train the employees they have.

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Interested in learning more about ACOs and Population Health Management? Join St. Joseph Health System, St. Joseph Heritage Healthcare, Cedars-Sinai Health System and Heritage Medical Systems on their  “ACOs and Population Health Management: An IT Enabled Health System” panel, taking place on November 4-5 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Beverly Hills.

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Evolution and Revolution: What Medical Group Leaders Are Learning through their Federal ACO Participation

evolutionBy Mark Hagland, first posted on Healthcare Informatics, September 29, 2014

Participation in the Pioneer ACO Program and the Medicare Shared Savings Program is turning out to be game-changing for many medical group leaders

In the annals of the history of medical group management in U.S. healthcare, some industry observers may well look back on the years 2012 through 2014 as a turning point for medical groups. That’s because it was during that period of time that a number of large medical groups entered into the Medicare Shared Savings Programs for accountable care organizations (ACOs)—either the regular Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP), or the Pioneer ACO Program. At the same time, too, many medical groups nationwide entered into ACO contracts with private health insurers; indeed, a large number began participating in both one of the Medicare programs and one or more private-sector programs. (As of May 2014, there were 338 MSSP ACOs and 23 Pioneer ACOs.)
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Interested in learning more about improving data sharing? Join HealthCare Partners, LLC, SacValley MedShare (SVMS) and Valley Presbyterian Hospital on their ”Improving Data Sharing with Interoperability” panel taking place on November 4-5 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Beverly Hills.
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Seeing the Potential in Physician-Led ACOs, Dr. Mostashari Makes a Shift

ACOSBy Mark Hagland, first posted on Healthcare Informatics, September 26, 2014

Farzad Mostashari, M.D., the former National Coordinator for Health IT, after a brief stopoff at the Brookings Institution, launches a new company to facilitate physician-governed ACOs

When he left his position as National Coordinator for Health Information Technology in October 2013, after two years and seven months in the federal healthcare IT czar position, no one doubted that he would continue to make his presence known in some way in the U.S. healthcare world.
First. Dr. Mostashari left the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) to join the Washington, D.C.-based think tank The Brookings Institution, as a Visiting Fellow “focused on healthcare payment reform and helping independent practices with care transformation,” according to his LinkedIn profile. But he was only at Brookings nine months before he announced that he had become founder and CEO of a new consulting and technology services firm, Aledade, Inc. (Bethesda, Md.). According to its website, under its “What We Do” tab, it says that “Aledade makes it easy and inexpensive for Primary Care Physicians to form Accountable Care Organizations. We offer primary care doctors a complete package of resources, services, and technology needed to establish the ACO with no upfront costs.”
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Interested in learning more about integrating data and analytics? Join  University of Texas at Dallas, UT Southwestern Medical Center, UT System, Medical Center Health System and  UTMB Health on their “Integrating Data and Analytics to Meet The Triple Aim” panel, taking place on December 10-11 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Houston.
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Cerner, Intermountain Latest to Align for DoD EHR Contract

EHRBy Rajiv Leventhal, first posted on Healthcare Informatics, September 25, 2014

The Kansas City, Mo.-based vendor Cerner has announced a strategic agreement with Intermountain Healthcare (Salt Lake City, Utah), as it continues to compete for the Department of Defense Healthcare Management Systems Modernization (DHMSM) electronic health record (EHR) contract.

Cerner is a member of the Leidos Partnership for Defense Health, an alliance that includes Leidos and Accenture, a global IT and management consulting company. If awarded, the Leidos Partnership will aim to transition the Department of Defense (DoD) smoothly and securely to an open, modern, secure and interoperable system. Intermountain will work with Cerner to meet the military’s specific requirements to modernize its EHR process.

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Interested in learning more about payer-provider alignment strategies?  Join North Texas Regional Extension Center, Seton Ministry- Ascension Health Information Services and Baylor Scott & White Health on their  ”Thriving in a New Reimbursement Model: Why Data is Key to Population Health Management” panel, taking place on December 10- 11 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Houston.

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Survey: Interoperability, Cost Continue to Hold Back ACOs

surveyBy Rajiv Leventhal, first posted on Healthcare Informatics, September 25, 2014

Premier, eHealth Initiative survey suggests many ACOs lack mobile applications and face high costs

A recent survey of 62 accountable care organization (ACO) participants revealed that 100 percent of respondents have trouble gaining access to data outside of their organizations. Although most ACOs have the health IT in place to improve clinical quality, poor interoperability across systems and providers remains their biggest barrier, according to the survey conducted by the Charlotte, N.C.-based Premier, Inc. and the eHealth Initiative.
Compounding the challenge of accessing and sharing data is the fact that 88 percent of the ACOs face significant obstacles in integrating data from disparate sources, and 83 percent report challenges integrating technology analytics into workflow—barriers that become more acute as ACOs add new platforms or build on their expansive network of medical settings. As ACOs collect data from more sources, they also report concerns about interoperability and data management. Interoperability of disparate systems is a significant challenge for 95 percent of organizations using health IT, and could be limiting the abilities of ACOs to exchange data.Full Story

Interested in learning more about securing ePHI? Join UCLA Health, Kaiser Permanente Orange County, Sharp HealthCare and Leidos Health on their Securing ePHI: Striking a Balance Between Usability and Security” panel, taking place on November 4-5 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Beverly Hills.

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Interview with Jacob Reider, MD, Deputy National Coordinator, CMO, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT

Jacob Reider, MD, Deputy National Coordinator, Chief Medical Officer, Office of the National Coordinator for Health ITJacob Reider, MD is a family physician with 20 years of experience in health information technology and special interest in clinical innovation, user experience, and clinical decision support. His background includes leadership roles in nearly all facets of the health IT domain – from small start-up companies to academic facilities, primary care medical groups, and large health IT development organizations. Dr. Reider has served as a member of the Board of Trustees of the American Medical Students Association, the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine, and has served in directorial positions on boards of several innovative health IT companies.

As a distinguished faculty member of the Institute’s upcoming Health IT Summit in Washington D.C., taking place, October 7-8, 2014, Reider shares insight into his role at the Office the National Coordinator for Health IT .

Institute: 
Can you please start by giving us an overview  of your role as the Deputy National Coordinator and CMO at the Office of the Coordinator for Health IT?

Reider: We created the role of the Chief Medical Officer to send a clear message to the care providers that they have a point of contact here inside of ONC.  I continue to practice medicine (though much less often than I would like!) and while I am therefore not walking a mile in their shoes – I do tangibly understand the challenges that care providers are having as they work toward the meaningful use of health information technology.  We created a team @ ONC called the “Office of the Chief Medical Officer” in 2012, and have a great group of folks on that team who are focused on quality, safety and usability.  We’ve recently re-aligned ONC a bit and since I’ve taken on the role of Deputy National Coordinator, this group is now led by our Chief Nursing Officer Judy Murphy and we’ve re-named it the Office of Clinical Quality and Safety.  The team remains focused on the same priorities and is staffed by a group of fantastic physicians, nurses, and health policy experts.  Through Judy, the team still reports to me – and that gives me a chance to remain connected to their important work.  My role as Deputy is to support our National Coordinator, Karen DeSalvo.  Both internally and externally – there are too many speaking engagements, committees to run, teams to mentor, and decisions to make for one person – so Dr. DeSalvo and I work closely to apportion the work of the National Coordinator across at least two of people.  Much of my day-to-day work is focused on the policy work of ONC, our standards and technology work including our health IT  certification program, and of course the work of the quality, safety and usability team.

Institute: From a national perspective, what do you view as the biggest roadblocks in attesting to Meaningful Use Stage 2?

Reider: Stage 2 is a heavier life for hospitals and providers, and we’re seeing challenges in a few places.  First, in some communities, it’s been hard for folks to find “trading partners” to meet the transitions of care objective.  It’s as if one kid is out  in the field to play catch – and it’s hard to play catch until another join.  This isn’t unusual with new tools – it happened with telephones, fax machines and even e-mail.  It’s a short-lived problem, and we are already seeing signs that it’s abating as more hospitals and provider organizations get on board.  Another challenge is for folks who serve either rural or underserved populations, where Internet access is sparse.  It’s been hard for some of these folks to get 5% of their patients to access their health information electronically.  We’ve seen some innovative solutions to this problem – as some folks have set up kiosks in their offices or sponsored classes at the local library, where there is often both assistance and Internet access.

Institute: What is your best advice for providers on the path to achieving Meaningful Use Stage 2?

Reider: We like to focus on the “bright spots” and my advice to folks who are struggling is always to reach out to others who have found success.  Very often, there is a “positive deviant” in a region or community who is more than happy to offer advice and guide others toward success. In addition to support offered by the regional extension centers, there are also a number of health IT fellows across the country who are more than happy to help providers work through their own challenges.

Institute: What are 2-3 future trends hospitals, medical groups, health plans, and employers must be aware of as they try to leverage information technology?

Reider: 

1)      Quality in a transformed health care system.  We know that our care delivery system pays more for volume than value – but the shift from payment for volume to payment for value will continue – and health information technology will be an essential part of that migration.  We all need to re-think our processes with this in mind – and resist the temptation to look to the computer as a way for us to offer MORE care – and to use it as a tool to provide BETTER care.

2)      Interoperability.  Quality, Effectiveness and efficiency are WHY we’re pushing forward on interoperability.  But the WHAT is just as important.  We’re all working hard – and folks should be aware of emerging standards, innovative solutions, and collaboration opportunities – both locally and nationally  – to help us all work toward improved interoperability if health IT.

Institute: You will be speaking at the upcoming Health IT Summit in Washington DC, what can our attendees expect to take away from your Keynote?

Reider: Like your attendees, I have a passion for working with others to find the best shared solutions to important problems.

About  iHT² 

Institute for Health Technology Transformation (iHT²) is the leading organization promoting the collection of private sector executives and public growth and effective use of technology in the health sector. Through the joint efforts of the Institute provides programs that stimulate innovation, education and a critical understanding of how to improve the technological applications, solutions and equipment quality, safety and efficacy of health care. The Institute is working in partnership withHealthcare Informatics and was acquired by the Vendome Group, LLC, Healthcare Informatics’ parent company, in December 2013. Vendome produces high-quality information for professionals in the healthcare industry and serves their needs through online, print, mobile, webinars and face-to-face engagement.  For more information, visit www.ihealthtran.com.

Interview with Patricia Mook, MSN , RN , NEA-BC, CNIO, Inova Health System

Patricia Mook. MSN , RN , NEA-BC, CNIO, Inova Health SystemAs a distinguished faculty member of the Institute’s upcoming Health IT Summit in Washington D.C., taking place, October 7-8, 2014, Mook shares insight into her role at Inova Health System.

Institute: Tell me about your role at Inova Health System.

Mook:  At Inova, I hold the privilege of being the first Chief Nursing Information Officer (CNIO) for this health care system. It is my job to provide visionary leadership and establish direction for a comprehensive clinical informatics and education program with a primary focus on clinical and nursing practice, administration, research and academic partnership in support of interdisciplinary patient driven care.

Institute: Your team implemented Epic across Inova’s 5 hospitals in 7 months.  What challenges did your team face?  Lessons learned?

Mook: Pre employment training is essential to mitigate challenges faced but in order to keep up with the unending race of changes, we had to think quickly and initiate a unit based expert to assist in the development of knowledge and skill in the safe use of the EHR..  Here at Inova, I addressed this with the development of a collaborative Super User program that supports the end users locally in their hospitals and clincs. They champion the adoption of new workflows and technology and serve as coaches to their clinical colleagues.

Institute: How did Inova move from EMR implementation to optimization?

Mook: As the CNIO, I work collaboratively with the CMIO and the VP of Enterprise Applications to optimize the EHR through constant design and redesign of the EHR as we follow our guiding principle . Our goal is provide standardization and get to a OneInova process. My job is to persistently advocate for nursing practice and clinical documentation to be on a agreed standard  and to insist upon following best practice as it is defined by the organization.

About  iHT² 

Institute for Health Technology Transformation (iHT²) is the leading organization promoting the collection of private sector executives and public growth and effective use of technology in the health sector. Through the joint efforts of the Institute provides programs that stimulate innovation, education and a critical understanding of how to improve the technological applications, solutions and equipment quality, safety and efficacy of health care. The Institute is working in partnership withHealthcare Informatics and was acquired by the Vendome Group, LLC, Healthcare Informatics’ parent company, in December 2013. Vendome produces high-quality information for professionals in the healthcare industry and serves their needs through online, print, mobile, webinars and face-to-face engagement.  For more information, visit www.ihealthtran.com.

Ryan Bosch, MD, FACP, MBA, Vice President, Chief Medical Information Officer , Inova Health System

Ryan Bosch, MD, FACP, MBA, VP, CMIO, Inova Health SystemAs a distinguished faculty member of the Institute’s upcoming Health IT Summit in Washington D.C., taking place, October 7-8, 2014, Bosch shares insight into his role at Inova Health System.

Institute: Tell me about your role at Inova Health System.

Bosch:  My role as VP of Informatics emerged after the 3 years in Epic  “Go Live” mode. As CMIO, I was a Project Principle and with the CIO and Project Leader, co-lead the roll out of 11 hospitals and 150 ambulatory sites. Today, I lead the Informatics Department. Our divisions include all of System Training, Inova Learning Resources, field informatics analysts, Provider Team, and Meaningful Use/HIE team.  We practice informatics 2.0. This is something new, called enterprise informatics, and we are dedicated to the workflow now the profession/service line.

Institute: Your team implemented Epic across Inova’s 5 hospitals in 7 months.  What challenges did your team face?  Lessons learned?

Bosch: More like what challenges did we not face is the easier answer… Our biggest challenges were the following: Change Management, Governance, Timing of go lives, IT Culture, ordersets, training requirements, User Access, Balancing optimization and Growth, innovation, knowledge transfer, HIE.

Institute: How did Inova move from EMR implementation to optimization?

Bosch: We are just starting this journey now, much to the chagrin of 1000’s of end users. On top of that, we have a double upgrade of Epic platform in front of us until May 2015.  We will Optimize. However, optimization is not a demand management issue.  Optimization is an asset/capacity management issue.  We are candid with what we can do and with what budget and FTEs and when. Regulatory changes, ICD 10, HIE, and soon again ICD-10 exerts a HUGE drain on our build capacity.  Growth is ever present.  Optimization is a slow but steady process.

Institute: You will be participating on the Anatomy of a Health System panel with your colleagues. What will attendees take-away from the behind-the-scenes looks at one of the most progressive  health system in the country?

Bosch:What enterprise informatics has and will become here at Inova… Informatics 2.0.   What we have learned from others.  We are making better outcomes through People, Process, and Technology and have achieved HIMSS level 6 (From HIMSS Level 2) and MU II in the process.  We promote lean methods and solutions and have committed to 10 service line Kaizens each year…every year.  We will build out new functionality in Epic to assist our clinical end users.  We are innovating each day to help our patients by improving our workflows and the technology that supports them.  We work in an agile/iterative way with our end users, this is counter to culture, but it is differentiating us and driving quality, safety, and affordability for the patients we serve.  This has been the key to our Success.

About  iHT² 

Institute for Health Technology Transformation (iHT²) is the leading organization promoting the collection of private sector executives and public growth and effective use of technology in the health sector. Through the joint efforts of the Institute provides programs that stimulate innovation, education and a critical understanding of how to improve the technological applications, solutions and equipment quality, safety and efficacy of health care. The Institute is working in partnership withHealthcare Informatics and was acquired by the Vendome Group, LLC, Healthcare Informatics’ parent company, in December 2013. Vendome produces high-quality information for professionals in the healthcare industry and serves their needs through online, print, mobile, webinars and face-to-face engagement.  For more information, visit www.ihealthtran.com.

Interview with Ed Grogan, CHCIO, Vice President & CIO, Calvert Memorial Hospital

Ed Grogan, VP, Information Systems & CIO, Calvert Memorial Hospital During Ed’s tenure at Calvert, he was instrumental in writing the feasibility study which evolved into the creation of Maryland eCare and oversaw the first implementation of critical care telemedicine in the state which reduced ICU mortality at CMH by 40% in its first year of operation.  He championed various patient safety technology initiatives which reduced medication errors by 46% and reduced specimen collection errors by 99%.  He led technology modernization efforts in imaging services to reduce report turnaround time by 20%.  He led efforts to host a practice management and ambulatory electronic health record system for employed and independent physician practices in the county as well as a community health information exchange to connect these practices, the hospital, three imaging centers, and four outpatient labs.  Ed oversaw the attainment of meaningful use stage 1 and the implementation of meaningful use stage 2 technology for the hospital and physician practices including patient engagement and care coordination technologies.

As a distinguished faculty member of the Institute’s upcoming Health IT Summit in Washington D.C., taking place, October 7-8, 2014, Grogan shares insight into his role at Calvert Memorial Hospital.

Institute: Tell me about your role at Calvert Memorial Hospital.

Grogran: I serve as Vice President of Information Services with senior management oversight of information technology, telecommunications, and biomedical engineering for Calvert Memorial Hospital and for Calvert Health System, its parent organization with other operating units including Calvert Physician Associates.

Institute: Congratulations on being named one of the nation’s “Most Wired” by the American Hospital Association. What has been the biggest challenge this year?

Grogran: One of our greatest challenges was meeting federal timelines for meaningful use stage 2 electronic health records in both acute care and ambulatory care settings.  We have a great team at Calvert, and we were able to implement technology to meet these challenging deadlines for our hospital and for the physician practices we support.  The federal government recognized these challenges and just recently (August 29, 2014) offered relief from these stringent deadlines for the healthcare industry in 2014; nonetheless, we succeeded.

Institute: CMH was the first hospital in Maryland to implement critical care telemedicine. Can you describe the best environments for a successful telemedicine program?

Grogran: Our CEO, Jim Xinis, founded Maryland eCare in 2008, and I have assisted him with this effort as far back as 2006 in publishing a feasibility study and with ongoing support today.    Maryland eCare is a success due to the collaboration and commitment of the provider and payer communities and state government.  CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield provided a large grant to Maryland eCare to help fund initial costs.  Administrative leadership (chief executive officers, chief medical officers, chief financial officers, chief information officers) of the seven member hospitals of Maryland eCare have supported this effort by serving on the Board of Maryland eCare and contributing in other ways.  Even our governor encouraged us after touring our ICU in 2010 in working with the University of Maryland Medical System to enhance its telemedicine offerings.  The program is primarily successful due to the collaborative participation of our member hospital nurses and physicians working with remote intensivists and certified critical care nurses to provide the very best care for our most vulnerable patients, those who are critically ill, as evidenced by our improvements in reduced mortality, more diligent care 24×7, reduced length of stay, and improved nurse satisfaction.

Institute: This past July, the CMH launched its new online patient portal, called “MY CMH Care.” What steps has the hospital taken to engage patients?

Grogran: Always put the patient at the center of all decisions, treat patients as family, build trust with patients and members of the healthcare team, have passion for the mission of the healthcare organization you serve, and have confidence in your ability to make a difference.

About  iHT² 

Institute for Health Technology Transformation (iHT²) is the leading organization promoting the collection of private sector executives and public growth and effective use of technology in the health sector. Through the joint efforts of the Institute provides programs that stimulate innovation, education and a critical understanding of how to improve the technological applications, solutions and equipment quality, safety and efficacy of health care. The Institute is working in partnership withHealthcare Informatics and was acquired by the Vendome Group, LLC, Healthcare Informatics’ parent company, in December 2013. Vendome produces high-quality information for professionals in the healthcare industry and serves their needs through online, print, mobile, webinars and face-to-face engagement.  For more information, visit www.ihealthtran.com.

In Houston, Imaging is Included in the HIE

HIEBy Gabriel Perna, first posted on Healthcare Informatics, September 25, 2014

Imaging in health information exchanges (HIEs) is a developing concept.

The Orem, Utah-based KLAS Research recently surveyed 193 providers and found that demand for image exchange products is growing among them. Slowly but surely, organizations are seeing the value of exchanging images. A study from University of Michigan researchers found that when hospitals share images, there are better outcomes for the patient and significant cost savings for all parties. In total, they estimated $19 million in annual savings if imaging sharing capabilities were implemented in HIEs nationwide.

Count the Greater Houston Health Connect among the believers. The public nonprofit regional HIE, covering 20 counties in southeastern Texas, recently invested in DICOM Grid’s (Phoenix, Ariz.) software to allow its members to share images in the cloud. The HIE has only rolled out the image-sharing capabilities at three of its 10 member hospitals, but CTO and acting CEO, Phil Beckett, Ph.D., is confident that the capabilities will provide more value for its members.

Full Story

Interested in learning more about evolving models for data exchange?  Join North Cypress Medical Center, Greater Houston Healthconnect  and Texas Health Services Authority on their “Evolving Models for Data Exchange: Driving Value and Innovation” panel, taking place on December 10-11 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Houston.

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BREAKING NEWS: Medicare’s Pioneer ACO Program Loses Three More Participants

latest newsBy Rajiv Leventhal and Mark Hagland, first posted on Healthcare Informatics, September 25, 2014

Program began with 32 participants; now down to 19

Three more accountable care organizations (ACOs) have dropped out of Medicare’s Pioneer ACO program, dropping the total to 19, down from the program’s original 32, according to industry news reports and verified sources.The Franciscan Alliance, Genesys PHO and Renaissance Health Network have exited the program, which is now in its third year. In August, Sharp Healthcare, a San Diego-based health system, dropped out, saying that the ACO model was “financially detrimental.”
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Interested in learning more about mHealth and Telehealth? Join U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,  Bon Secours Medical Group, University of Kansas Medical Center and  State of Louisiana Department of Health & Hospitals on their  “mHealth & Telehealth: Reducing Readmissions through Innovative Care Models” panel, taking place on December 10- 11 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Houston.
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My Patient Portal Experience: Underwhelming So Far

patient portalsBy David Raths, first posted in Healthcare Informatics, September 23, 2014

Because I write about health IT all the time, I have been disappointed that my own primary care doctor has so far refused to go electronic. I think she is a great doctor in many ways. She really seems to listen and takes the time to assess what your health problem is. But going to her office does seem like a step back into my childhood of the 1960s and 1970s. Everything is on paper and involves the fax machine. She told me she doesn’t think the meaningful use incentives are worth disrupting her practice to implement. She said she would wait until the EHR and practice management software is more mature before switching. So despite the fact that I like her as a doctor, every once in a while I think about looking for a primary care practice that is more automated and that has a good patient portal.

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Interested in learning more about integrating data and analytics? Join UT Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas at Dallas, UT System, Medical Center Health System and UTMB Health on their “Integrating Data and Analytics to Meet The Triple Aim” panel, taking place on Decmeber 10-11 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Houston.

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Doug Fridsma to Depart ONC, Become Head of AMIA

Doug Fridsma, MDBy Gabriel Perna, first posted in Healthcare Informatics, September 22, 2014

Doug Fridsma, M.D., Ph.D., Chief Science Officer at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC), will be leaving the ONC to be President and CEO of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA).

Dr. Fridsma’s move was announced in an email from Karen DeSalvo, M.D., the National Coordinator for Health IT, to staff members. He will be staying with ONC until November, when he starts at AMIA.

Dr. DeSalvo says Fridsma will work with the ONC to help the agency transition. There isn’t a named replacement but she says, Erica Galvez will take on more responsibilities in interoperability as interoperability portfolio manager, and Steve Posnack will continue in his role as director of the Office of Standards and Technology.

Full Story 

Interested in learning more about ACOs and Population Health Management? Join St. Joseph Health System, St. Joseph Heritage Healthcare, Cedars-Sinai Health System  and Heritage Medical Systems on their “ACOs and Population Health Management: An IT Enabled Health System” panel, taking place on November 4-5 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Beverly Hills.

Click Here to Learn More 

What Caused the Fall of the Nevada HIE?

Health Information ExchangeBy Gabriel Perna, first posted in Healthcare Informatics, September 23, 2014

On Jan. 24, 2014, the board of directors at the Nevada Health Information Exchange (NV-HIE), the state-designated entity to foster data exchange, ceased operations by a vote of four to two.

Thanks to Nevada Open Meeting Law requirements, it’s immortalized for future generations to ponder.

One month after the vote, the NV-HIE shut down completely. CEO David LaBarge stayed on until March to close up operations completely. All the parties involved in the NV-HIE have since moved on and the only thing remaining is this website.

It’s easy to say the board killed the Nevada HIE that day in Carson City.  However, this isn’t a simple “whodunit.” The NV-HIE wasn’t done in by its board of directors, the maid, or the butler. There are several elements that led the people behind the NV-HIE to cease operations, just as there would be if a local startup restaurant flopped.

Full Story

Interested in learning more about improving data sharing? Join SacValley MedShare (SVMS) and Valley Presbyterian Hospital on their  ”Improving Data Sharing with Interoperability” panel, taking place on Novmeber 4-5 2014 at the Health IT Summit in Beverly Hills.

Click Here to Learn More 

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