iHT² Health IT Summit Atlanta – Case Study “Analytics Strategies to Improve Quality & Outcomes” with @tstrome


Trevor Strome, MSc, PMP
, @tstrome

Analytics Lead
WRHA Emergency Program
Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine
University of Manitoba

iHT2 case studies and presentations illustrate challenges, successes and various factors in the outcomes of numerous types of health IT implementations.  They are interactive and dynamic sessions providing opportunity for dialogue, debate and exchanging ideas and best practices.  This session will be presented by a thought leader in the provider, payer or government space.

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iHT² Health IT Summit Atlanta - Case Study “Analytics Strategies to Improve Quality & Outcomes”

 

10 things EMRs won’t say

EMR1. We come with a large price tag. Doctors are being encouraged by the federal government to ditch their messy handwritten paper records, replacing them with sleeker, quicker electronic health records that should improve patient care and reduce health spending. More physicians are coming on board: in 2013, 78% of doctors’ offices said they were using some form of electronic health records, up from 18% in 2001, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But so far, the transition to electronic health records hasn’t delivered the ease of use and savings advocates promised — and the choppy transition is having a ripple effect on consumers.

Full Story 

OpenNotes Expands Regional EHR Adoption

OpenNotes Expands Regional EHR Adoption

By Scott Mace, April 4, 2014, first posted on HealthLeaders Media

Kaiser Permanente Northwest is one of several healthcare providers participating in an effort to roll out open access to clinician notes as a standard of care throughout the Pacific Northwest.

A consortium of nine healthcare provider systems is targeting more than one million residents of Oregon and southwest Washington State in 2014 to provide open access to their physicians’ notes in electronic medical records.

The announcement this week marks the first time that OpenNotes, a national movement that urges health-related organizations to adopt open access to clinician notes as a standard of care, has been embraced simultaneously throughout an entire region.

Full Story 

Interview with Randy Thomas, Performance Analytics Service Executive, Encore Health Resources

Randy Thomas, Performance Analytics Service Executive, Encore Health ResourcesThomas has over 25 years of experience in HIT with a focus on analytics and the re-use of data to support the performance improvement efforts of healthcare organizations. Having served in a variety of leadership roles in strategic consulting and product management, Ms. Thomas offers a seasoned perspective on how to drive measurable results through the use of business intelligence in healthcare.

As a distinguished faculty member for the Institute’s Health IT Summit in Atlanta, taking place, April 15-16, 2014, Thomas shares insight into her role as a performance analytics service executive.

Institute: Can you please start by giving us a brief overview of Encore Health Resources and your role as Performance Analytics Services Executive?

Thomas: Encore is a healthcare IT consulting services firm focused on helping healthcare providers implement and optimize HIT technology to drive more efficient healthcare delivery and obtain added value from the reuse of data for analytics and measurement. I bring to my position more than 25 years of experience in HIT, with a focus on analytics and the re-use of data to support the performance-improvement efforts of healthcare organizations. I’ve served in a variety of leadership roles in strategic consulting and product management. I believe I offer a seasoned perspective on how to drive measurable results through the use of business intelligence in healthcare. Currently I’m an associate partner at Encore, with responsibility for our performance analytics practices.’

Institute:  What are 2-3 challenges healthcare providers are currently facing with healthcare analytics?

Thomas: Data and expectations. The demand for information and measurement has never been higher. Technology alone does not address these needs. Organizations need a transparent data-profiling discipline in place that tracks and ensures consistent, accurate, reliable data from source to target – in other words, from the front-line system where a clinician or other professional enters data and through the various applications until the data lands on a report or is used to calculate a metric. Often, we try to fix “bad data” in the report.  But the truth is, data is neither good nor bad: it is as is was created.  Data simply might not meet our expectations of what we thought it should be. So organizations need a rigorous data-profiling discipline to ensure that data arrives at its final destination in the “state” that is expected. Expectations need to be managed around what is possible — and when. Sometimes, executives want to measure something that requires new data sources.  Healthcare executives need to understand that just because an EHR is in place, there is no guarantee that any data will be available to support analytics and measurement.  The process requires thoughtful planning to ensure the data needed to support desired measurement and analytic efforts is appropriately captured in the course of reasonable workflow in the clinical setting.  New types of data can be obtained – but there is a time-lag between wishing it, making the changes in workflow and system configuration, and then having that data flow through to the analytics applications. This is critical to understand when engaging in incentives-based / risk-based contracts: you need to know you can accurately and consistently measure the metrics that will drive reimbursement.

Institute: What are some of the analytics tools that are helping to manage patient populations and patient experience?

Thomas: There are a ton of them, and there tends to be overlap from app to app with some unique capabilities at the margin. This is a very nascent market. Many vendors are claiming capabilities along a broad spectrum of need – from analytics to active care coordination. The data challenges in this area are pretty substantial. The traditional approach of using claims data can give a good baseline to understand a population, but the data is too old to use in active population management. Getting data from non-owned providers on a timely basis is a challenge. This is an area prime for attention in the industry: how can be enable data liquidity to support active population management?

Institute:  You will be participating on the panel discussion “ Insights from Patient Data: Managing the Health of a Population”   at the upcoming Health IT Summit in Atlanta, what can our attendees expect to take away from your participation?

Thomas: The messages will be, “It’s all about the data,” and, “Begin with the end in mind.” Useful data to support decision-making and performance improvement doesn’t just happen. Data needs must be built into the decision process for EHR implementation and optimization – and it all must be supported with enterprise-wide data governance so that everyone knows what needs to happen, why, and how to do it.

Interested in learning more about analytics and PHM strategies? Join Unity Health Care, Carilion Clinic, Bon Secours Medical Group, and Encore Health Resources during their “Insights from Patient Data: Managing the Health of  a Population” panel, taking place at the Institute’s Health IT Summit in Atlanta, April 25-16, 2014.

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Majority have EHR governance structure, advisory committees

Majority have EHR governance structure, advisory committeesBy Beth Walso, April 2, 2014, first posted on Clinical-Innovation+Technology

Sixty percent of those who responded to an EHR governance study have a formalized EHR governance structure in place.  HIMSS Analytics released the 2014 U.S. EHR Governance Study which queried 230 respondents about their current governance structure including effectiveness, efficiency and primary drivers, as well as challenges, success factors and associated vendors.

Full Story

Interested in learning more about electronic health records? Join Piedmont Atlanta Hospital and Baptist Health Care on their “Innovations in Healthcare: Leveraging Telemedicine and Mobile Solutions to Reduce Readmissions” panel at the Institute’s upcoming Health IT Summit in Atlanta, taking place April 15-16, 2014.

Click here to learn more!

Interview with Stephen Morgan, M.D., Senior Vice President, Carilion Clinic

Stephen Morgan, MD, SVP, CMIO Carilion ClinicAt the 600-physician Carilion Clinic integrated health system, Stephen Morgan, M.D., senior vice president and CMIO, is helping to lead transformative change along a number of dimensions. To begin with, the Roanoke, Virginia-based Carilion organization joined the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) for accountable care organizations (ACOs) in January 2013, and that step in itself has helped to spur the development of more coordinated approaches to care delivery and the acceleration of the creation of IT foundations to support the ACO financing and delivery model.

Full Story 

Interested in learning more about patient data? Join Unity Health Care, Bon Secours Medical Group and Carilion Clinic as they discuss the same topic on their, “Insights from Patient Data: Managing the Health of a Population” panel taking place at the Institute’s upcoming Health It Summit in Atlanta, taking place April 15-16, 2014.

Click here to learn more!

Toshiba’s Imaginary Wearable Computing Gloves Win April Fools’ Day

Toshiba's Imaginary Wearable Computing Gloves Win April Fools DayBy Jordan Crook, first posted on TechCrunch, April 1, 2014

If there was some over-arching, governing body that handed out awards to April Fools’ Day prankers, I should hope that Toshiba would get one.

The company today announced the Digit, sloughing off what is usually a pretty boring, business-y style to introduce something truly hilarious to the gadget world.

The Digit is a set of wearable computing gloves.

It has a “two-hand gestural user interface,” as well as a 32-megapixel camera, a 4K Ultra HD video camera, and a 4K Virtual Retina display. To use the screen, you literally cover your face with the gloves like the monkey who saw no evil. To use the phone, you hold your hand up to your face like a child pretending to be on the telephone. To listen to music, just stick your thumbs in your ears.

It’s adorable.

Full Story 

[INFOGRAPHIC] Stellar Star Rating is Imperative for Long-Term Success

Enrollment in Medicare Advantage (MA) plans is projected to reach 15 million by 2013. While the Affordable Care Act lowers payments to MA plans by more than $140 billion over the next decade, bonus payments based on high ratings in the Five-Star Quality Rating System can help make up for those lost dollars. Here are ways remote care management programs help enable MA health plans to reduce coss while achieving the 4-star and 5-star ratings needed to complete and win in this changing environment.

[CLICK HERE TO VIEW FULL INFOGRAPHIC]

Infographic


Intel-GE Care Innovations™
Infographic: Remote Care Management for MA Plans

 

The infographic was shared with the Institute at the San Francisco Health IT Summit, which took place, March 25-26, 2014 at the Presidio Golden Gate Club.

Interview with Mark Cohen, MD, PhD, VP Medical Affairs, Chief Quality Officer, Piedmont Atlanta Hospital

Mark Cohen, MD, PhD, VP Medical Affairs, Chief Quality Officer, Piedmont Atlanta HospitalMark Cohen, M.D., Ph.D., is Vice President of Medical Affairs and Chief Quality Officer at Piedmont Atlanta Hospital, the flagship facility within Piedmont Healthcare, a five-hospital integrated system based in Atlanta.  There, Dr. Cohen is helping to lead a broad clinical quality and performance improvement initiative, focusing on using publicly reported quality measures to help improve care quality in areas such as mortality and serious safety event rates, as well as working to improve the health system’s patient satisfaction, physician satisfaction, and staff satisfaction scores. Dr. Cohen, a panelist at the Health IT Summit in Atlanta April 15-16, spoke recently with Mark Hagland, Editor-in-Chief of Healthcare Informatics, regarding his team’s ongoing work in these important areas.

Full Interview

Interested in learning more about electronic health records? Join Piedmont Atlanta Hospital and Baptist Health Care on their “Innovations in Healthcare: Leveraging Telemedicine and Mobile Solutions to Reduce Readmissions” panel at the Institute’s upcoming Health IT Summit in Atlanta, taking place April 15-16, 2014.

Click here to learn more!

“Patient ≠ Patient: Providing Individualized Care in a Marketing Dominant World” with Ari Lightman, Distinguished Service Professor, Digital Media and Marketing, Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College

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"Patient ≠ Patient: Providing Individualized Care in a Marketing Dominant World" with Ari Lightman, Distinguished Service Professor, Digital Media and Marketing, Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College

[PowerPoint] iHT² Research Report Findings “Episode Analytics: Essential Tools for New Healthcare Models”

iHT² along with top health IT executives including the CIO from Yale-New Haven Health System, Executive Director of HCI3, SVP & Chief Strategy Officer from Intermountain Healthcare, CMO from SAS, and more, recently released the “Episode Analytics: Essential Tools for New Healthcare Models” Research Report.

This report showed how payors, providers, and ACOs, can leverage analytics against cross continuum episodes of care to decrease avoidable complications and cut waste in healthcare.

Join Peter Chingos, Senior Solutions Architect, SAS Health Analytics Practice, Health & Life Sciences, SAS North America, as he reviews the findings and answers your questions in San Francisco.

iHT² research projects are a beginning point for greater stakeholder collaboration to achieve a learning health care system to improve patient outcomes and accelerate research through the effective application of technology.

iHT² Research Report Findings “Episode Analytics: Essential Tools for New Healthcare Models"

Interview with Richard Osborne, Healthcare Practice Leader, Point B

Richard Osborne, Healthcare Practice Leader, Point B

He recently helped lead a readmission reduction program for a Bay Area based Health System, which resulted in a nearly 50% reduction in the rate of readmission for the target population.

For more than 25 years, Richard Osborne has led complex, strategic business initiatives and solved mission-critical business and technology problems in the healthcare industry. His expertise includes clinical process improvement, clinical systems design and implementation, novel care models including ACOs, and re-admission reduction and care optimization.

Osborne has worked with the majority of multi-facility hospital systems and large health plans in the Bay Area, helping them improve service efficiency and achieve better outcomes. He recently helped lead a readmission reduction program for a Bay Area based Health System, which resulted in a nearly 50% reduction in the rate of readmission for the target population. Osborne has also just help guide a patient-centered care optimization program for a California partnership of providers and payors.

Osborne holds an MBA, a Master of Health Services Administration, and a B.S. in Finance from the University of Utah.

Osborne will be participating on the “Volume to Value: Transforming U.S. Healthcare Delivery” panel at the Institute’s upcoming Health IT Summit in San Francisco, March 25-26, 2014.

Institute: Can you please start by giving us a brief overview of Point B and your role as Healthcare Practice Leader?

Osborne: Point B is an employee-owned management consulting and venture investment firm that specializes in helping clients form, execute and thrive. Numerous organizations have sought outPoint B for its objective leadership, deep expertise and ability to transform strategies into reality.  Founded in 1995, Point B serves clients in Southern California, the Bay Area, Chicago, Denver, Phoenix, Portland, and Seattle. Point B has a healthcare practice with significant experience consulting with provider organizations and health plans for over 18 years, has successfully delivered over 1,280 projects, and was recently ranked #27 on Modern Healthcare’s top healthcare consulting firms. We support organizations working on critical challenges in today’s complex healthcare environment—from reform, to productivity and performance measures, to major transformations.  Healthcare organizations look to us to improve service delivery using lean techniques, advice on organizational effectiveness and strategic priorities, and lead key initiatives.

Institute: You recently helped lead a readmission reduction program for a Bay Area based Health System, can you share more with us and the challenges as well as the benefits of this program?

Osborne:  The primary challenges we encountered related to process and practitioner variegation as well as unnecessary process complexity. This was particularly complex where patients were transitioned through various sets of simultaneous processes.  Reducing this complexity and variation allows you to focus on key handoffs and build safeguards into the simplified processes.  Another key component is the ability to identify potential length of stay outliers early on in their stay – often at admit.  Dong this allows scare resources to be deployed most effectively. The benefits of the program were a nearly 50% reduction in 30 day “all cause” readmission for our target group of patients.

Institute: What are 2-3 future trends hospitals, medical groups, health plans, and employers must be aware of as they try to leverage information technology?

Osborne: 

1. The blurring lines between our traditional view of Providers, Payors and Medical Groups will continue to drive the ability to control resources while maintaining laser focus on outcomes.

2. IT will continue its evolution from being viewed as a pure cost reducing strategy to an enabling strategy.

3. Three more things Data, Data, & more Data. Data becoming viewed as an asset rather than an outcome will change the face of healthcare.

Institute: You will be participating on the panel discussion “Volume to Value: Transforming US Healthcare Delivery” at the upcoming Health IT Summit in San Francisco, what can our attendees expect to take away from your participation?

Osborne: The barn door is closed.  There is no going back…

Care delivery success in this new paradigm will come through TRULY INTEGRATED networks.  That is not to say that the only way to succeed is to be part of a truly integrated network.  There will be plenty of opportunity to create structures that will support or be supported by these networks.  There will, however, be winners and unfortunately losers…  I hope that through this conference, attendees will gain a more clear picture of where their organizations are on this continuum and help move them along the winner path.

Hospital Okays Google Glass in the Emergency Department

Hospital Okays Google Glass in the Emergency Room By Clint Boulton, Reporter, first posted on the CIO Journal, March 20, 2014

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has modified Google Glass wearable computers so they can be used to treat patients in its emergency department without running afoul of privacy regulations. Using software from a startup, the hospital ensures no data travels over Google’s servers, says Dr. John Halamka, the hospital’s CIO.

“We have total control of all data flowing to and from Glass,” said Mr. Halamka in an interview Thursday.

With Glass, physicians can call up patient data through voice commands and view it on the screen mounted on the device’s eyeglass frame. The setup lets physicians keep their hands free while treating patients.

But Google Inc., which stores Glass-generated data on its cloud, won’t sign the contract hospitals are required to obtain from cloud vendors to meet requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. HIPPAA requires that cloud vendors accept responsibility for managing patient information in accordance with the law’s privacy rules. This has prevented hospitals such as the Cleveland Clinic from using it.

Full Story

Interested in hearing from John Halamka? Join him during his opening keynote, “Health IT in a Healthcare Reform World: Connecting Patients, Providers, and Payers” taking place at the Institute’s upcoming Health IT Summit in Boston, taking place May 13-14, 2014.

Interview Ronald Weinstein, M.D., Director, Arizona Telemedicine Program

Ronald Weinstein, M.D., Director, Arizona Telemedicine Program“Virtual” is the new reality in healthcare. We are in the midst of a transformation that eventually could affect everyone. By 2020, 25 to 50% of all transactions in healthcare may be outsourced.

Dr. Ronald S. Weinstein was born in Schenectady, New York, and received his B.S. Degree from Union College (Schenectady, New York) in 1960. He attended Albany Medical College from 1960 to 1962 and received his M.D. degree from Tufts University School of Medicine in 1965. He became interested in basic research in medical school and developed an independent research program while a medical student. Weinstein is widely regarded as a pioneer in the field of telepathology and has created major academic programs in this emerging area. Dr. Weinstein is often cited as the “father of telepathology”. He authored the first paper on telepathology, in 1986, and invented robotic telepathology, for which he was awarded several US Patents.

Weinstein’s work in telepathology forms the basis for telepathology programs in over 35 countries. These programs provide diagnostic services for tens of thousand of patients world-wide. Dr. Weinstein frequently lectures on the topic. For example, he has given invited lectures at international symposia in seven countries in Europe, Asia and Latin America. Dr. Weinstein has worked on developing international standards and platforms for telepathology and has been a consultant to the European Union, the World Health Organization, and the Japanese and Panamanian Governments. He also promoted international telepathology for third world nations as President of the International Council of the Societies of Pathology, a World Health Organization-sponsored Council that coordinates the activities of pathology societies in 46 countries.

Weinstein will be presenting his case study at the Institute’s upcoming Health IT Summit in San Francisco, taking place at the Presidio Golden Gate Club, March 25-26, 2014.

Dr. Weinstein is widely regarded as a pioneer in the field of telepathology and has created major academic programs in this emerging area. Dr. Weinstein is often cited as the “father of telepathology”.

Institute: As founding director of the Arizona Telemedicine Program, what makes the program unique and global?

Weinstein: The Arizona Telemedicine Program functions as a regional collaborative.  It uses an Application Service Provider business model.  Fifty-five independent healthcare organizations pay annual membership fees to gain access to a large share, state-wide IT infrastructure, IT expertise, training programs and distance education content.  Every Arizona rural legislative district has multiple active telemedicine sites.  Thus, the Arizona Telemedicine Program has a very diverse group of stakeholders with vested interests in the success of the program.

Institute: As an industry, when it comes to telemedicine what should we focus on?

Weinstein: Initial focus should be on: 1- legal and regulatory issues (i.e., Medical licensure; reimbursement; and Credentialing) and 2- on proven applications that work (i.e., teleradiology, telestroke, etc.)

Institute: Can you describe the best environments for a successful telemedicine program?

Weinstein: Integrated health care systems (i.e., Marshfield Clinics; Department of Veterans Affairs)

Institute: You’ve made significant contributions in research, service and education. Can you share one piece of advice to your fellow leaders in health IT?

Weinstein: Telemedicine works best when it is enthusiastically embraced in a C-suite that also values innovation.

Institute: What should Summit attendees attend your case study? Can you list 2-3 specific takeaways from your talk?

Weinstein:

  1. Telemedicine is not easy to do but is often worth the effort
  2. “Maturity is the capacity for delayed gratification.” Telemedicine programs don’t mature overnight
  3. Institution culture plays a disproportionately large role in enabling telemedicine programs to succeed

Institute: Why is telemedicine so important to the future of healthcare?

Weinstein: “Virtual” is the new reality in healthcare. We are in the midst of a transformation that eventually could affect everyone. By 2020, 25 to 50% of all transactions in healthcare may be outsourced.

Interested in learning more about the Arizona Telemedicine Program? Join Dr. Weinstein during his case study, taking place, March 25-26 at the Institute’s Health IT Summit in San Francisco.

Click here to join your peers and learn more

Interview with John Showalter, Chief Health Information Officer, University of Mississippi Medical Center

John Showalter, MD, MSIS, Chief Health Information Officer, University of Mississippi Medical Center

Although it isn’t often discussed, I think the biggest concern is wasteful technology investments. Systems that make the wrong technology investments and cannot create a return on investment may not survive as payments decrease.

John Showalter, M.D., MSIS is a board certified internal medicine physician and is the chief health information officer at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. He received his BS in Biomedical Engineering from Columbia University and his MD and Masters in Information Systems in Health Care Delivery and Management from Penn State University. He recently helped lead the implementation of 23 Epic applications in five hospitals and ninety-five clinics on June 1st 2012 and he was named top young Health IT executive by HealthData Management in 2012. His interests include quality improvement and intelligent use of technology, and he blogs about innovating health care through clinical knowledge management. In the last year, he has also co-authored two articles “The Effect of a Provider-Enhanced Clinical Decision Support Tool for Guiding Venous Thromboembolism Pharmacoprophylaxis in ‘Low-Risk’ Patients” and “Validity of the Brief Inpatient Screen for intimate partner violence among adult women.”

Showalter will be presenting at the Institute’s upcoming CMIO & Physician Executive Symposium taking place in San Francisco, March 27, 2014 at the Hyatt Fisherman’s Warf.  As Chief Medical Information Officer, Showalter shares insight about his role with the Institute’s education department. Below are excerpts from that interview:

Institute:  As Chief Health Information Officer, what are your top priorities for 2014?

Showalter: In my role as Chief Health Information Officer, I have responsibly for utilizing technology to improve both health care delivery and clinical research. The top priorities for health care delivery are the regulatory requirements around the ICD-10 conversion, Meaningful Use and Value Based Purchasing. Utilizing analytics for system improvement closely follows those priorities. With regard to research, my top priorities are building a system that facilitates clinical trials and inter-institution collaboration and the consolidation and centralization of research data.

Institute: What makes the University of Mississippi Medical Center IT department unique?

Showalter: The University of Mississippi Medical Center is a true state organization; even our physicians are state employees. The IT department is centralized and supports not only healthcare, but also research and education. We have taken an enterprise applications approach in the last several years and eliminated over 100 applications. On June 1st of 2012, we implemented 23 Epic applications in 5 hospitals and in over 90 ambulatory clinics without a CIO. Within six months of go-live, we had retired over $6 million in legacy systems. We continue to strive to achieve a demonstrable return on investment both financially and in patient care.

Institute: Describe some of the innovative or disruptive IT initiatives launched at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Some of our more notable innovations are:

  1. Giving HIM analysts the tools to do remote support and shifting key element of physician support to HIM from the IT department.
  2. Disabling telephone dictation, but allowing full dictation and transcription in the EHR. That change lead to a $1.5 million per year savings.
  3. Integrating Clinical Documentation Improvement workflows into the EHR. Early results show a 10% increase in our case mix index.
  4. Piloting a nursing unit based data visualization and clinical alert monitor on our pediatrics floors with remote telehealth nurses also observing.

Institute: You’ve published extensively on Clinical Knowledge Management. Can you share one piece of advice to your fellow leads in health IT?

Showalter: The key to ROI is making actionable knowledge as efficiently as possible- and then acting.

 Institute: As an industry, when it comes to technology what should we be most concerned with?

Showalter: Although it isn’t often discussed, I think the biggest concern is wasteful technology investments. Systems that make the wrong technology investments and cannot create a return on investment may not survive as payments decrease.

Institute: Why should Symposium attendees attend your presentation? Can you list 2-3 specific takeaways from the talk?

Showalter: My presentation is going to focus on practical and executable health IT. Participants will leave with an understanding of the technology that still needs to mature for significant return on investment. They will also be able to describe achievable implementations with significant return on investment. Additionally, they will be able to explain the technologies that can currently be leverage for better and less expensive care.

About  iHT² 

Institute for Health Technology Transformation (iHT²) is the leading organization promoting the collection of private sector executives and public growth and effective use of technology in the health sector. Through the joint efforts of the Institute provides programs that stimulate innovation, education and a critical understanding of how to improve the technological applications, solutions and equipment quality, safety and efficacy of health care. The Institute is working in partnership withHealthcare Informatics and was acquired by the Vendome Group, LLC, Healthcare Informatics’ parent company, in December 2013. Vendome produces high-quality information for professionals in the healthcare industry and serves their needs through online, print, mobile, webinars and face-to-face engagement.  For more information, visit www.ihealthtran.com.

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